I.6 makes music expressively with others, with a widening repertoire, in a range of different styles and genres

General observation

Children and young people perform expressively and coherently with others, with an increasing repertoire of pieces, and, potentially, in a range of styles and genres

Interpretation

Children and young people can pick up on and convey expressive meaning in group performance, adjusting their mode of playing or singing to contribute coherently to an ensemble

I6A is aware of, and emulates the expressivity of others’ playing or singing in ensemble performance

Children and young people appreciate and emulate the expressive nature of other's singing and playing in group work

Strategies

Practitioners model and, potentially, discuss expressivity in group work

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Emulates the expressivity of others' playing in group performance to a very limited extent and with very little conviction
  3. Emulates the expressivity of others' playing in group performance to a limited extent and with little conviction
  4. Emulates the expressivity of others' playing in group performance to a moderate extent and with moderate conviction
  5. Emulates the expressivity of others' playing in group performance to a considerable extent and with considerable conviction
  6. Emulates the expressivity of others' playing in group performance entirely convincingly
Gauging consistency
  1. Emulation of expressivity is observed rarely (on around one in eight occasions or fewer)
  2. Emulation of expressivity is observed occasionally (on around one in four occasions)
  3. Emulation of expressivity is observed regularly (on around one in two occasions)
  4. Emulation of expressivity is observed frequently (on around three in four occasions)
  5. Emulation of expressivity is observed consistently (on around seven in eight occasions or more)
Resources
MfCaYPwCN Information

Chapter 10

Focus 2 Information

Chapter 14

In the Key Information

In the Key ...


I6B contributes own expressivity to others’ playing or singing in ensemble performance

Children and young people contribute their own expressivity to ensemble performances

Strategies

Practitioners may model the emulation of expressivity in group work, and may discuss each others' strategies for performing particular musical features

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Offers very limited expressivity for others to emulate
  3. Offers limited expressivity for others to emulate
  4. Offers a moderate level of expressivity for others to emulate
  5. Offers a considerable level of expressivity for others to emulate
  6. Offers a high level of expressivity for others to emulate
Gauging consistency
  1. Expressive playing for others to emulate is observed rarely (on around one in eight occasions or fewer)
  2. Expressive playing for others to emulate is observed occasionally (on around one in four occasions)
  3. Expressive playing for others to emulate is observed regularly (on around one in two occasions)
  4. Expressive playing for others to emulate is observed frequently (on around three in four occasions)
  5. Expressive playing for others to emulate is observed consistently (on around seven in eight occasions or more)
Resources
MfCaYPwCN Information

Chapter 10

Focus 2 Information

Chapter 14

In the Key Information

In the Key ...


I6C improvises with others with stylistic coherence, sharing and developing material in increasingly sophisticated ways

Children and young people improvise with others, sharing material in increasingly sophisticated ways, and with stylistic coherence

Strategies

Practitioners model the transfer of material within known stylistic constraints, and encourage children and young people to do the same

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Improvises with others with very limited sharing and developing of material and very limited stylistic coherence
  3. Improvises with others with limited sharing and developing of material and limited stylistic coherence
  4. Improvises with others with a moderate level of sharing and developing of material and moderate stylistic coherence
  5. Improvises with others with a high level of sharing and developing of material and a high level of stylistic coherence
  6. Improvises with others with very sophisticated sharing and development of material and a very high level of stylistic coherence
Gauging consistency
  1. The sharing and development of material in improvisations is observed rarely (on around one in eight occasions or fewer)
  2. The sharing and development of material in improvisations is observed occasionally (on around one in four occasions)
  3. The sharing and development of material in improvisations is observed regularly (on around one in two occasions)
  4. The sharing and development of material in improvisations is observed frequently (on around three in four occasions)
  5. The sharing and development of material in improvisations is observed consistently (on around seven in eight occasions or more)
Resources
MfCaYPwCN Information

Chapter 10

Focus 2 Information

Chapter 14

In the Key Information

In the Key ...


I6D develops increasingly advanced ensemble skills, managing material of growing technical and musical complexity as part of a group

Children and young people show increasingly advanced ensemble skills in group work, and are able to perform material of growing technical and musical complexity

Strategies

Practitioners use more or less conventional teaching strategies to support children and young people's technical and musical development in group work - with perhaps a greater emphasis on demonstration than verbal instruction

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Has a very limited level and range of ensemble skills
  3. Has a limited level and range of ensemble skills
  4. Has a moderate level and range of ensemble skills
  5. Has advanced ensemble skills
  6. Has highly sophisticated ensemble skills
Gauging consistency
  1. Ensemble skills are in evidence rarely (on around one in eight occasions or fewer)
  2. Ensemble skills are in evidence occasionally (on around one in four occasions)
  3. Ensemble skills are in evidence regularly (on around one in two occasions)
  4. Ensemble skills are in evidence frequently (on around three in four occasions)
  5. Ensemble skills are in evidence consistently (on around seven in eight occasions or more)
Resources
MfCaYPwCN Information

Chapter 10

Focus 2 Information

Chapter 14

In the Key Information

In the Key ...



Additional information