P.3 makes simple patterns in sound intentionally, through repetition or regularity

General observation

The key here is the intentionality behind the pattern that is made - for example, children and young people may produce a regular beat without being aware of it through motor activity that is not driven by sound. Intentionality can be gleaned through repetition or regularity that occurs in the wider context of variation, or through the alignment of what is achieved through external patterns (see I.3).

Interpretation

The child or young person can process and reproduce the basic forms of pattern in sound that underlie all music.

P3A intentionally makes simple patterns through repetition

Children and young people intentionally produce patterns of sounds through repetition - vocal or 'external'. Intentionality in the repetition may be ascertained through the capacity of the child or young person to produce different sounds. For example, on a keyboard, a certain note or notes may be repeated in the context of variation.

Strategies

Encourage or model repetition through means which a child or young person can already produce a variety of sounds (vocally or using a sound maker). Recognise and reward repetition that is produced (for example, through praise or imitation - see I.3)

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Intentionally produces patterns of repetition in relation to at least one type or manifestation of sound
  3. Intentionally produces patterns of repetition in relation to at least two types or manifestations of sound
  4. Intentionally produces patterns of repetition in relation to at least three types or manifestations of sound
  5. Intentionally produces patterns of repetition in relation to at least four types or manifestations of sound
  6. Intentionally produces patterns of repetition in relation to at least five types or manifestations of sound
Gauging consistency
  1. Repetition in sound production (when stimulated, for example, through interaction) is observed rarely (on around one in eight occasions or fewer)
  2. Repetition in sound production (when stimulated, for example, through interaction) is observed occasionally (on around one in four occasions)
  3. Repetition in sound production (when stimulated, for example, through interaction) is observed regularly (on around one in two occasions)
  4. Repetition in sound production (when stimulated, for example, through interaction) is observed frequently (on around three in four occasions)
  5. Repetition in sound production (when stimulated, for example, through interaction) is observed consistently (on around seven in eight occasions or more)
Resources
All Join In Information
Videos Information

Romy creates patterns in pitch playing notes with the same name up and down all octaves of the piano.

Romy plays an interval of a fourth (G and C) repeating this pattern ascending the keyboard.

Let's All Listen Information

Song 29

MfCaYPwCN Information

Chapter 4

Commusication Songs Information

23-36


P3B intentionally makes simple patterns through a regular beat

Children and young people intentionally produce a regular beat, potentially through a variety of means. Intentionality is the critical factor here, and this can be judged by potential or actual variability.

Strategies

Encourage or model a regular beat through making sounds which the child or young person is known to enjoy. Reinforce production through praise or imitation (see I.3).

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Intentionally produces at least one manifestation of a regular beat (in terms of tempo and type of sound)
  3. Intentionally produces at least two manifestations of a regular beat (in terms of tempo and type of sound)
  4. Intentionally produces at least three manifestations of a regular beat (in terms of tempo and type of sound)
  5. Intentionally produces at least four manifestations of a regular beat (in terms of tempo and type of sound)
  6. Intentionally produces five manifestations or more of a regular beat (in terms of tempo and type of sound)
Gauging consistency
  1. Sound production involving a regular beat (in contexts where one may be expected) is observed rarely (on around one in eight occasions or fewer)
  2. Sound production involving a regular beat (in contexts where one may be expected) is observed occasionally (on around one in four occasions)
  3. Sound production involving a regular beat (in contexts where one may be expected) is observed regularly (on around one in two occasions)
  4. Sound production involving a regular beat (in contexts where one may be expected) is observed frequently (on around three in four occasions)
  5. Sound production involving a regular beat (in contexts where one may be expected) is observed consistently (on around seven in eight occasions or more)
Resources
All Join In Information
Videos Information

Bulbul plays the drum, creating a simple pattern through a regular beat.

Hannah is seven years old with SLD and impaired social communication skills in association with a general developmental delay. Hannah can hum melodies after hearing them a few times and music is one of the only things that really holds her attention. Hannah creates simple patterns on the drum, alternating playing with mallets held in her right and left hands.

Let's All Listen Information

Song 45

MfCaYPwCN Information

Chapter 4

Commusication Songs Information

23-36


P3C intentionally makes simple patterns through regular change

Children and young people intentionally produce regular change - in pitch, loudness, timbre or to the beat. Changes may occur in isolation or combination.

Strategies

Encourage or model regular change using sounds which the child or young person is known to enjoy. Reinforce production through praise or imitation (see I.3).

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Intentionally produces at least one manifestation of regular change in sound
  3. Intentionally produces at least two manifestations of regular change in sound
  4. Intentionally produces at least three manifestations of regular change in sound
  5. Intentionally produces at least four manifestations of regular change in sound
  6. Intentionally produces five manifestations or more of regular change in sound
Gauging consistency
  1. Sound production involving regular change (in contexts where this may be expected) is observed rarely (on around one in eight occasions or fewer)
  2. Sound production involving regular change (in contexts where this may be expected) is observed occasionally (on around one in four occasions)
  3. Sound production involving regular change (in contexts where this may be expected) is observed regularly (on around one in two occasions)
  4. Sound production involving regular change (in contexts where this may be expected) is observed frequently (on around three in four occasions)
  5. Sound production involving regular change (in contexts where this may be expected) is observed consistently (on around seven in eight occasions or more)
Resources
All Join In Information
Videos Information

Yesef is eight years old with ASD and associated speech and language and social communication difficulties. He is able to sing melodies and phrases and enjoys playing the drums with increased tempo and dynamics. Yesef plays the drum with mallets, one in each hand. He increases the speed of his playing intentionally from slow to fast. He enjoyed and repeated this pattern of playing a number of times during the session.

Shivan is learning to play an ascending and descending pattern of notes (C, D, E, F G, G, G, F, E, D, C) on the piano with help from his teacher.

Shivan plays an ascending scale, using his left hand.

Let's All Listen Information

Song 7

MfCaYPwCN Information

Chapter 4

Commusication Songs Information

23-36


P3D uses sound to symbolise other things

Given the opportunity, children and young people use sound to symbolise other things. They may use different sounding objects to choose between activities, for example.

Strategies

Once a child or young person recognises the symbolic meaning attached to a particular sound, he or she can be encouraged to use this proactively - to communicate decision-making, for example. Use sounds and meanings that the child or young person finds appealing - that they will be motivated to communicate about.

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Uses at least one sound symbol proactively
  3. Uses at least two sound symbols proactively
  4. Uses at least three sound symbols proactively
  5. Uses at least four sound symbols proactively
  6. Uses five sound symbols or more proactively
Gauging consistency
  1. Proactive use of sound symbols (in appropriate contexts) is observed rarely (on around one in eight occasions or fewer)
  2. Proactive use of sound symbols (in appropriate contexts) is observed occasionally (on around one in four occasions)
  3. Proactive use of sound symbols (in appropriate contexts) is observed regularly (on around one in two occasions)
  4. Proactive use of sound symbols (in appropriate contexts) is observed frequently (on around three in four occasions)
  5. Proactive use of sound symbols (in appropriate contexts) is observed consistently (on around seven in eight occasions or more)
Resources
All Join In Information
Videos Information

The practitioner sings, 'Who's sitting next to me on my left'. Each child has a sound-maker, which represents his or her name. When it is David's turn, he plays his instrument to signify that he is present.

Zoe has a fine gauze placed over her. When the teacher sings 'Where oh where can Zoe be?', Zoe responds by making sound with a crinkly pillow that she is holding, at which point the teacher pulls the material away while counting to three. Zoe uses the sound to communicate where she is.

Let's All Listen Information

Song 46

MfCaYPwCN Information

Chapter 4

Commusication Songs Information

12-14, 23-36, 47, 48



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