R.5 attends to whole pieces: recognises prominent structural features (eg choruses); responds to general characteristics (eg tempo); develops preferences

General observation

Children and young people attend to pieces as a whole - potentially of increasing length and complexity. They may recognise prominent structural features, such as the choruses of songs, for example, and they may respond to general characteristics such as tempo, mode, tessitura and texture. They may develop preferences for particular pieces.

Interpretation

Perceptually and cognitively, the child or young person concerned recognises pieces of music as entities in terms of a sequence of related groups of events and a framework of pitch and time upon which events are 'hung'.

R5A attends to whole pieces of music, becoming familiar with an increasing number and developing preferences

Children and young people attend to pieces of music as complete entities, concentrating throughout. Further evidence may be gleaned proactively (P.5.A) or interactively (I.5.A).They may become familiar with an increasing number of different pieces, potentially of increasing length and complexity, and develop preferences.

Strategies

Give children and young people the opportunity to hear and listen to a range of short and simple pieces, with features of sound that they are known to like (particular rhythms or tempi, for example). Label the pieces verbally or through other means, so they can be referred to in future choice-making. Seek to extend a child or young person's experience of pieces through exposure to a wide repertoire, potentially of growing length and complexity.

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Attends to at least one entire piece of music
  3. Attends to at least two entire pieces of music
  4. Attends to at least three entire pieces of music
  5. Attends to at least four entire pieces of music and develops preferences
  6. Attends to five pieces of music of more and has preferences
Gauging consistency
  1. Attention to whole pieces is observed rarely (on around one in eight occasions or fewer)
  2. Attention to whole pieces is observed occasionally (on around one in four occasions)
  3. Attention to whole pieces is observed regularly (on around one in two occasions)
  4. Attention to whole pieces is observed frequently (on around three in four occasions)
  5. Attention to whole pieces is observed consistently (on around seven in eight occasions or more)
Resources
All Join In Information
Videos Information

Theo shows a preference for the song he would like to hear by humming "Oh Susannah". (Theo also uses sound to symbolise other things, R.3.D and musical motifs to symbolise things, R.4.D.)

Theo becomes excited, smiling, laughing and running toward his mum as he hears and recognises "Postman Pat" being played on the piano. His reaction indicates a preference for this piece of music.

Let's All Listen Information

Song 14

Focus 2 Information

Chapter 13


R5B recognises prominent structural features (such as the choruses of songs)

Children and young people recognises prominent structural features of pieces, such as the choruses of songs, or a pause in each verse of a strophic song. Recognition may be evident through anticipation or a response as the structural feature is heard

Strategies

Children and young people are exposed to music with simple, repetitive structures that facilitate recognition

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Recognises at least one structural feature in a piece
  3. Recognises at last two structural features in a piece or pieces
  4. Recognises at least three structural features in pieces
  5. Recognises at least four structural features in pieces
  6. Recognises five structural features or more in pieces
Gauging consistency
  1. Recognition is observed rarely (on around one in eight occasions or fewer)
  2. Recognition is observed occasionally (on around one in four occasions)
  3. Recognition is observed regularly (on around one in two occasions)
  4. Recognition is observed frequently (on around three in four occasions)
  5. Recognition is observed consistently (on around seven in eight occasions or more)
Resources
All Join In Information
Videos Information

Ben shows a particular reaction to the structure of this orchestral piece by Rodrigo, laughing in response to the descending scale that he hears. He shows this reaction over a number of session within this particular piece, validating his response. (See Ben show a similar response to Rodrigo in another session.)

As Adam plays Beethoven's 'F

Let's All Listen Information

Song 41

Focus 2 Information

Chapter 13


R5C responds to general characteristics of pieces (such as mode, tempo and texture)

Children and young people respond differentially to the general characteristics of pieces, such as major/minor modes (in the Western tradition), quick and slow tempi, and different textures (brought about through the use of different instruments or voices, for example).

Strategies

Give children and young people the opportunity to hear pieces with differing general characteristics in different contexts. If possible, discuss, for example, how quiet, slow music may be peaceful, whereas loud, quick music may be exciting; how music in the minor mode may be regarded as 'sad' and music in the major mode, 'happy'.

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Responds to at least one general characteristic of pieces
  3. Responds to at least two general characteristics of pieces
  4. Responds to at least three general characteristics of pieces
  5. Responds to at least four general characteristics of pieces
  6. Responds to five general characteristics of pieces or more
Gauging consistency
  1. Recognition is observed rarely (on around one in eight occasions or fewer)
  2. Recognition is observed occasionally (on around one in four occasions)
  3. Recognition is observed regularly (on around one in two occasions)
  4. Recognition is observed frequently (on around three in four occasions)
  5. Recognition is observed consistently (on around seven in eight occasions or more)

R5D responds to pieces through connotations brought about by their association with objects, people or events in the external world

Children and young people respond to a piece or pieces as a consequence of their association with other things. For example, a 'goodbye' song may result in sadness, or a TV theme tune may induce excitement at the thought of the programme to follow.

Strategies

Pieces may be systematically linked (in the form of auditory 'objects of reference') to particular events, people or activities

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Responds to at least one piece through external association
  3. Responds to at least two pieces through external association
  4. Responds to at least three pieces through external association
  5. Responds to at least four pieces through external association
  6. Responds to five pieces or more through external association
Gauging consistency
  1. Responses are observed rarely (on around one in eight occasions or fewer)
  2. Responses are observed occasionally (on around one in four occasions)
  3. Responses are observed regularly (on around one in two occasions)
  4. Responses are observed frequently (on around three in four occasions)
  5. Responses are observed consistently (on around seven in eight occasions or more)
Resources
All Join In Information
Videos Information

Shivan responds to the 'goodbye' song, recognising that it means the end of the session. He shows an understanding of the song's connotation by reaching out towards his teacher and a recognition of the song as he rocks in his chair.

Let's All Listen Information

Song 24

Focus 2 Information

Chapter 13



Additional information