I.5 performs and/or improvises music of growing length and complexity with others, using increasingly developed ensemble skills

General observation

Children and young people create or re-create music with others using ensemble skills that may develop and become more refined over time

Interpretation

Children and young people can attend to others' performance while performing themselves, use the latter to inform the former, and be aware of their own potential influence in ensemble situations.

I5A performs simple pieces simultaneously with others, sharing a common part

Children and young people play or sing simple pieces with others in which participants sing or play the same thing

Strategies

Practitioners may enlist the potential motivation and energy of group music making - singing together or playing rhythms together, for example.

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Sings or plays short or repetitive pieces with others, joining in intermittently, and with at least a moderate degree of accuracy
  3. Sings or plays short or repetitive pieces with others, joining in for around half the time, and with at least a moderate degree of accuracy
  4. Sings or plays short or repetitive pieces with others, joining in consistently, and with at least a moderate degree of accuracy
  5. Sings or plays pieces of moderate length and/or complexity with others, joining in consistently, and accurately
  6. Sings or plays pieces of moderate length and complexity with others, joining in consistently, and accurately
Gauging consistency
  1. Participation at a given level is observed rarely (on around one in eight occasions or fewer)
  2. Participation at a given level is observed occasionally (on around one in four occasions)
  3. Participation at a given level is observed regularly (on around one in two occasions)
  4. Participation at a given level is observed frequently (on around three in four occasions)
  5. Participation at a given level is observed consistently (on around seven in eight occasions or more)
Resources
All Join In Information
Videos Information

This lunchtime vocal group sings 'Kumbaya' together while accompanied by the teacher at the piano.

Myles possesses absolute pitch and a very strong musical memory. At the time of the recording, Myles had been taking cello lessons for seven years, first learning on an adapted instrument with an extra long spike. Over this time he gained the necessary confidence to play his cello with an independent piano accompaniment and performed to his peers and at school concerts in a variety of ensembles as well as accompanying a school choir on his own, playing a simple repeated phrase. Myles also plays alongside his peers at a music centre. Playing by ear is a feature of his playing and he can also improvise original music. Here, Miles plays the cello, sharing a part with others. Although the ensemble cannot be seen in the clip the other parts can be heard. (See a demonstration of Miles playing the cello, maintaining an independent part in I.5.B.)

Let's All Listen Information

Song 30

Focus 2 Information

Chapter 13


I5B performs with others, using increasingly developed ensemble skills and maintaining an independent part

Children and young people play or sing with others, maintaining (to a greater or lesser extent) an independent part, and with increasingly developed ensemble skills (performing in time and, where appropriate, in tune with others)

Strategies

Practitioners may model ensemble playing using different parts - beginning, for example, with two parts, where one is simpler than the other, to start with, with textures becoming more complex as appropriate. The child or young person concerned could be positioned near to one of the performers.

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Performs with others, maintaining a simple part in a simple texture with a high degree of support
  3. Performs with others, maintaining a simple part in a simple texture with a moderate level of support
  4. Performs with others, maintaining a simple part in a simple texture alone
  5. Performs with others, maintaining a part of moderate complexity in a moderately complex texture alone
  6. Performs with others maintaining a part of moderate complexity in a texture of considerable complexity alone
Gauging consistency
  1. Engagement at a given level is observed rarely (on around one in eight occasions or fewer)
  2. Engagement at a given level is observed occasionally (on around one in four occasions)
  3. Engagement at a given level is observed regularly (on around one in two occasions)
  4. Engagement at a given level is observed frequently (on around three in four occasions)
  5. Engagement at a given level is observed consistently (on around seven in eight occasions or more)
Resources
All Join In Information
Videos Information

Liam is eight years old with ASD and associated speech and language difficulties. He shows a special affinity for music, significantly in comparison with other skills and interests. As the teacher sings the song "Crazy Little Thing Called Love" by Queen, Liam accompanies, playing the omnichord. This is a song Liam learned the day before the clip was filmed, demonstrating an ability to learn quickly by ear. (See Liam sing and accompany himself, I.5.A.)

Nicole plays the melody of "She'll Be Coming Round the Mountain" with her right hand on the piano while her teacher provides the left hand accompaniment. Nicole plays the piece in the key of F# Major.

Romy plays the melody of Brahms 'Variations on a Theme by Haydn' using both right and left hand at times, as her teacher provides accompaniment. Romy is still in the process of learning the piece fully but she shows a development in her ability to play whole pieces here rather than only motifs or fragments of pieces (See Romy at Level 4).

Myles possesses absolute pitch and a very strong musical memory. At the time of the recording, Myles had been taking cello lessons for seven years, first learning on an adapted instrument with an extra long spike. Over this time he gained the necessary confidence to play his cello with an independent piano accompaniment and performed to his peers and at school concerts in a variety of ensembles as well as accompanying a school choir on his own, playing a simple repeated phrase. Myles also plays alongside his peers at a music centre. Playing by ear is a feature of his playing and he can also improvise original music. Here, Myles plays the cello as part of a string ensemble, maintaining his part in a round of "Frere Jacques". (To see Miles improvise within this session go to I.5.C.)

Let's All Listen Information

Song 45

Focus 2 Information

Chapter 13


I5C improvises with others, repeating, varying and/or building on the material that is offered in simple ways

Children and young people improvise with others, deriving their material to a greater or lesser extent from what is offered

Strategies

Practitioners can model patterns of improvisation in which material is imitated, in very simple ways at first, and encourage children and young people to do the same

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Improvises with others, deriving at least some material straightforwardly from what is presented, and with at least a basic level of overall coherence
  3. Improvises with others, deriving at least a moderate amount of material straightforwardly from what is presented, and with at least a moderate level of overall coherence
  4. Improvises with others, deriving most material straightforwardly from what is presented, and with overall coherence
  5. Improvises with others, deriving most material from what is presented in at least two ways, and with overall coherence
  6. Improvises with others, deriving most material from what is presented in a variety of ways, and with overall coherence
Gauging consistency
  1. Derivation of material from others in improvisations is observed rarely (on around one in eight occasions or fewer)
  2. Derivation of material from others in improvisations is observed occasionally (on around one in four occasions)
  3. Derivation of material from others in improvisations is observed regularly (on around one in two occasions)
  4. Derivation of material from others in improvisations is observed frequently (on around three in four occasions)
  5. Derivation of material from others in improvisations is observed consistently (on around seven in eight occasions or more)
Resources
All Join In Information
Videos Information

Romy plays 'If You're Happy and You Know It' on the piano, modulating into different keys and slightly varying the melody at times as her teacher provides an accompaniment.

Myles possesses absolute pitch and a very strong musical memory. At the time of the recording, Myles had been taking cello lessons for seven years, first learning on an adapted instrument with an extra long spike. Over this time he gained the necessary confidence to play his cello with an independent piano accompaniment and performed to his peers and at school concerts in a variety of ensembles, as well as accompanying a school choir on his own by playing a simple repeated phrase. Myles also plays alongside his peers at a music centre. Playing by ear is a feature of his playing and he can also improvise original music. Here, Myles plays the cello as part of a string ensemble. In this ensemble, each player is given an opportunity to improvise over a tonic-dominant ostinato that is provided.

Nick, who has absolute pitch, improvises with his teacher. As Nick is seated at one piano and his teacher at the other, he listens to the key changes being led by the teacher, playing with and varying what he hears. Sometimes he deliberately plays in the wrong key!

Let's All Listen Information

Song 39

Focus 2 Information

Chapter 13


I5D improvises with others, consciously offering material for them to use

Children and young generate material for others to improvise on in the course of group work

Strategies

Practitioners model the production of ideas and their imitation, and encourage children and young people to do the same

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Offers very limited material for others to improvise upon
  3. Offers limited material for others to improvise on
  4. Offers a moderate amount and variety of material for others to improvise on
  5. Offers a significant amount and variety of material for others to improvise on
  6. Offers a substantial amount and variety of material for others to improvise on
Gauging consistency
  1. Material is offered rarely (on around one in eight occasions or fewer)
  2. Material is offered occasionally (on around one in four occasions)
  3. Material is offered regularly (on around one in two occasions)
  4. Material is offered frequently (on around three in four occasions)
  5. Material is offered consistently (on around seven in eight occasions or more)
Resources
Videos Information

Michael is thirteen years old. He has absolute pitch, an extremely good musical memory. He is able to remember tunes he's heard before in the right key, and can create his own tunes and improvise on them. He has taken the Associated Board Preparatory test. Music is a very important part of Michael's life. In this clip Michael improvises on the piano with his music therapist, in the unusual key of Bb minor (referred to by Michael here as the enharmonic key of A# minor), which he has chosen. Michael plays both melodic fragments and chords, which his music therapist builds on. Michael offers a new key of B minor for the improvisation. He particularly loves the move of the semitone.

Nick plays the cello, rehearsing with a local community orchestra for the evening's concert. He attends the orchestra regularly.

Focus 2 Information

Chapter 13



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