P.5 (re)creates short and simple pieces of music; potentially of growing length and complexity; increasingly 'in time' and (where relevant) 'in tune'

General observation

Children and young people produce or reproduce short and simple pieces - either vocally or using instruments. These may be of increasing length and complexity over time, as the necessary skills develop. At first, tuning and/or timing may approximate to available cultural models - fidelity to which may also increase over time.

Interpretation

The child or young person has a grasp of pieces of music as entities and can produce or reproduce these through one or more channels of performance.

P5A performs short and simple pieces of music, potentially of growing length and complexity, increasingly 'in time' and (where relevant) 'in tune'

Children and young people reproduce short and simple pieces - either vocally or using instruments. These may be of increasing length and complexity over time, as the necessary skills develop. At first, tuning and/or timing may approximate to available cultural models - fidelity to which may also increase over time.

Strategies

Encourage performance of pieces through providing appropriate repertoire, and through music-making in groups (see I.5).

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Reproduces at least one short and simple piece with a moderate degree of competence
  3. Reproduces at least two short and simple pieces with a moderate degree of competence
  4. Reproduces at least three short and simple pieces with a moderate degree of competence
  5. Reproduces at least four pieces competently, potentially of moderate length and/or complexity
  6. Reproduces five pieces or more competently, of moderate length and complexity
Gauging consistency
  1. Is able and willing to perform a piece or pieces rarely given the opportunity (on around one in eight occasions or fewer)
  2. Is able and willing to perform a piece or pieces occasionally given the opportunity (on around one in four occasions)
  3. Is able and willing to perform a piece or pieces regularly given the opportunity (on around one in two occasions)
  4. Is able and willing to perform a piece or pieces frequently given the opportunity (on around three in four occasions)
  5. Is able and wiling to perform a piece or pieces consistently given the opportunity (on around seven in eight occasions or more)
Resources
All Join In Information
Videos Information

Michael is thirteen years old. He has absolute pitch, an extremely good musical memory, is able to remember tunes he's heard before in the right key, and can create his own tunes and improvise on them. He has taken the Associated Board Preparatory test. Music is a very important part of Michael's life. Here, Michael plays "Boating Lake" on the piano, using both left and right hands, for the ABRSM prep test. He learned the piece by ear, supported by enlarged notation. (See Michael playing a piece he has composed, P.5.C, and improvising with his teacher I.5.D.)

During his lesson Freddie plays a number of short pieces on the piano that he is learning. Here he plays the piece entitled 'Hopping'. (Also see Freddy improvising P.5.B and working on piano technique (P.5.D).

Liam sings a song by Queen as he accompanies himself by playing the harmony on the omnichord. Liam has a special affinity for music and excels at learning tunes by ear. (To see Liam accompany his teacher go to I.5.B.)

Let's All Listen Information

Song 15

Focus 2 Information

Chapter 13


P5B improvises on familiar pieces of music, varying the original material in simple ways

Children and young people vary short and simple pieces of music with which they are familiar in performance, by changing one feature (such as rhythm or melody) or more - through the additional, removal or alteration of material.

Strategies

Encourage improvisation through demonstration and involvement in group improvisation (see I.5).

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Improvises on at least one piece using one type of musical variation with a moderate degree of competence
  3. Improvises on at least two pieces using one type of musical variation or more with a moderate degree of competence
  4. Improvises on at least three pieces using one type of musical variation or more with a moderate degree of competence
  5. Improvises competently on at least four pieces using two types of musical variation or more
  6. Improvises competently on five pieces or more using two types of musical variation or more
Gauging consistency
  1. Coherent improvisation is observed rarely (on around one in eight occasions or fewer) given appropriate opportunities
  2. Coherent improvisation is observed occasionally (on around one in four occasions) given appropriate opportunities
  3. Coherent improvisation is observed regularly (on around one in two occasions) given appropriate opportunities
  4. Coherent improvisation is observed frequently (on around three in four occasions) given appropriate opportunities
  5. Coherent improvisation is observed consistently (on around seven in eight occasions or more) given appropriate opportunities
Resources
All Join In Information
Videos Information

Freddie has been singing and playing the tune of 'Twinkle, twinkle little star'. He begins to sing, improvising and ornamenting the melody in various keys, always in tune and in time.

Let's All Listen Information

Song 37

Focus 2 Information

Chapter 13


P5C creates short and simple pieces of music, potentially of increasing length, complexity and coherence, whose general characteristics may be intended to convey particular moods or feelings, and which may be linked to external associations

Children and young people compose short and simple pieces of music, which may increase in length and complexity over time, and become increasingly musically coherent. The general characteristics of the pieces may be intended to convey particular emotions, and the pieces may be associated with external events, activities, places or people.

Strategies

Practitioners may teach by example, creating new pieces with a specific emotional intent. They may assist pupils in suggesting ideas for pieces, working on them or indicating how they may be completed.

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Creates short and simple pieces with a high level of assistance that are at least moderately musically coherent
  3. Creates short and simple piece with a moderate level of assistance that are at least moderately musically coherent
  4. Creates short and simple pieces will little or no assistance that are least moderately musically coherent
  5. Prac
  6. Creates pieces of moderate length and complexity, with no assistance, which are coherent musically
Gauging consistency
  1. Successful composition occurs rarely in supportive contexts (on around one in eight occasions or fewer)
  2. Successful composition occurs occasionally in supportive contexts (on around one in four occasions)
  3. Successful composition occurs regularly in supportive contexts (on around one in two occasions)
  4. Successful composition occurs frequently in supportive contexts (on around three in four occasions)
  5. Successful composition occurs consistently in supportive contexts (on around seven in eight occasions or more)
Resources
Videos Information

Michael is thirteen years old. He has absolute pitch, an extremely good musical memory, is able to remember tunes he's heard before in the right key, and can create his own tunes and improvise on them. He has taken the Associated Board Preparatory test. Music is a very important part of Michael's life. In this clip, Michael is playing, from memory, a piece he previously composed for the piano, in which there are different variations of the main melody. Only one variation is shown here. He also plays in different keys and with further variations of the melody. He plays this piece, maintaining his part, while being accompanied by the music therapist (also I.5.B).

When asked if he knows any songs from his music class about trains Theo begins to hum "I've been working on the railroad". Theo recreates this piece, which is linked to the external associations of his music class and of trains.

Focus 2 Information

Chapter 13


P5D has the physical capacity to produce short and simple pieces of music, potentially evolving to meet the needs of material of growing complexity and length

Children and young people are physically able to perform short and simple pieces through singing, playing or managing technology. This physical capacity may evolve to enable them to produce material of increasing complexity and length

Strategies

Practitioners can promote the development of the capacity to perform through exemplifying what is required, through verbal instruction or through physical assistance - potentially fading this as a pupil's skills develop.

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Has the capacity to perform at least one short and simple piece with a moderate degree of competence
  3. Has the capacity to perform at least two short and simple pieces with a moderate degree of competence
  4. Has the capacity to perform at least three short and simple pieces competently
  5. Has the capacity to perform at least four pieces, of moderate length and/or complexity, competently
  6. Has the capacity to perform five pieces or more, of moderate length and complexity, competently
Gauging consistency
  1. Shows the capacity to perform (in appropriate contexts) rarely (on around one in eight occasions or fewer)
  2. Shows the capacity to perform (in appropriate contexts) occasionally (on around one in four occasions)
  3. Shows the capacity to perform (in appropriate contexts) regularly (on around one in two occasions)
  4. Shows the capacity to perform (in appropriate contexts) frequently (on around three in four occasions)
  5. Shows the capacity to perform (in appropriate contexts) consistently (on around seven in eight occasions or more)
Resources
Videos Information

Freddie works on piano technique with his teacher, playing a five finger exercise. The exercise is repeated, ascending the keyboard chromatically. Freddie has absolute pitch, allowing him to play the notes 'silently' while singing the pitches accurately in the correct sequence, as he hears them. (Freddie's variation and repetition of this five note motif also applies to P.4.B.)

Freddie sings and plays major scales on the piano in different keys ascending and descending, alternating between his right and left hand, working on technique with his teacher.

Freddie sings and plays chromatic scales on the piano, working on his technical skills. Freddie works on a number of piano exercises including major and minor scales, five finger exercises, whole tone scales etc.

The teacher guides Romy in learning a C major ascending scale in her right hand.

Romy is working with her teacher, learning to play Brahms's 'Variations on a Theme by Haydn'. Aspects of her technique are of particular focus such as playing with both right and left hands and the melodic endings of phrases.

Focus 2 Information

Chapter 13



Additional information