R.6 engages with pieces as abstract ‘narratives in sound’ in which patterns of notes are repeated or varied over time to create meaning; differentiates between styles and performances

General observation

Children and young people engage with pieces as narratives in sound, which have their own, abstract meanings. Children and young people differentiate between different styles of music and different performances.

Interpretation

Children and young people subconsciously recognise that one note or notes may appear to derive from another or others. They recognise the probabilistic patterns that are the determinants of style, and the features of interpretation that mark out one performance from another.

R6A develops a mature response to music, engaging with pieces as abstract ‘narratives in sound’

Children and young people engage with people as abstract narratives in sound, and show an aesthetic response - the music making sense and conveying meaning through its culturally situated content and structure.

Strategies

Give children and young people the opportunity to hear a wide range of pieces, including some that are heard regularly, of growing length and complexity. Listening may be reinforced through proactive and interactive work.

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Engages with at least one relatively short and simple piece of music as an abstract narrative in sound
  3. Engages with at least two relatively short and simple pieces of music as abstract narratives in sound
  4. Engages with at least three pieces of music of moderate length and complexity as abstract narratives in sound
  5. Engages with at least four pieces of music of moderate length and complexity as abstract narratives in sound
  6. Engages with five pieces of music or more of significant length and complexity as abstract narratives in sound
Gauging consistency
  1. Engagement with piece(s) of music as narratives in sound is observed rarely (on around one in eight occasions or fewer)
  2. Engagement with piece(s) of music as narratives in sound is observed occasionally (on around one in four occasions)
  3. Engagement with piece(s) of music as narratives in sound is observed regularly (on around one in two occasions)
  4. Engagement with piece(s) of music as narratives in sound is observed frequently (on around three in four occasions)
  5. Engagement with piece(s) of music as narratives in sound is observed consistently (on around seven in eight occasions or more)
Resources
MfCaYPwCN Information

Chapter 10

Focus 2 Information

Chapter 14

In the Key Information

In the Key ...


R6B becomes familiar with an increasing number of styles and genres and develops preferences

Children and young people become familiar with music in an increasing number of styles and genres and develop likes and dislikes.

Strategies

Give children and young people the opportunity to hear a wide range of musics, and, if possible, encourage them to reflect on their preferences and the reasons for them

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Is familiar with at least one style or genre
  3. Is familiar with at least two distinct styles or genres
  4. Is familiar with at least three distinct styles or genres and has preferences
  5. Is familiar with at least four distinct styles or genres and has preferences
  6. Is familiar with five distinct styles or genres or more and has preferences
Gauging consistency
  1. Stylistic awareness is observed rarely (on around one in eight occasions or fewer)
  2. Stylistic awareness is observed occasionally (on around one in four occasions)
  3. Stylistic awareness is observed regularly (on around one in two occasions)
  4. Stylistic awareness is observed frequently (on around three in four occasions)
  5. Stylistic awareness is observed consistently (on around seven in eight occasions or more)
Resources
MfCaYPwCN Information

Chapter 10

Focus 2 Information

Chapter 14

In the Key Information

In the Key ...


R6C becomes familiar with different performances of pieces and styles of performance and develops preferences

Children and young people get to know different performances of particular works (typically through recordings) and different styles of performance and develop preferences

Strategies

Once children and young people are familiar with a piece, try introducing them to performances by different artists. Then introduce them to the same artist performing different pieces. Consider different styles of performance (for example, Bach being played on the harpsichord or on the piano).

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Is aware of at least two different performances of a particular piece
  3. Is aware of at least two different performances of two pieces or more
  4. Is aware of at least three different performances of three pieces or more
  5. Is aware of at least two different styles of performance of four pieces or more
  6. Is aware of several different styles of performance of a number of different pieces
Gauging consistency
  1. Awareness is observed rarely (on around one in eight occasions or fewer)
  2. Awareness is observed occasionally (on around one in four occasions)
  3. Awareness is observed regularly (on around one in two occasions)
  4. Awareness is observed frequently (on around three in four occasions)
  5. Awareness is observed consistently (on around seven in eight occasions or more)
Resources
MfCaYPwCN Information

Chapter 10

Focus 2 Information

Chapter 14

In the Key Information

In the Key ...


R6D becomes aware of how music as an abstract narrative in sound relates to other media (words, movement, etc) to create multi-modal meaning

Children and young people become aware of how musical meaning relates to multimedia experience (as in film music, songs, dance, etc.).

Strategies

Practitioners may explore with children and young people how meaning in multimedia events and activities is created - either at an intuitive level (using dance, for example) or through verbal explanation

Evaluating engagement
  1. No evidence
  2. Is aware of the meaning of at least one multimedia experience involving music
  3. Is aware of the meaning of at least two multimedia experiences involving music
  4. Is aware of the meaning of at least three multimedia experiences involving music
  5. Is aware of the meaning of at least four multimedia experiences involving music
  6. Is aware of the meaning of five multimedia experiences or more involving music
Gauging consistency
  1. Awareness is observed rarely (on around one in eight occasions or fewer)
  2. Awareness is observed occasionally (on around one in four occasions)
  3. Awareness is observed regularly (on around one in two occasions)
  4. Awareness is observed frequently (on around three in four occasions)
  5. Awareness is observed consistently (on around seven in eight occasions or more)
Resources
MfCaYPwCN Information

Chapter 10

Focus 2 Information

Chapter 14

In the Key Information

In the Key ...



Additional information